Nokia Chief Reveals Why Nokia Didn’t Go Android

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A lot of harsh words and bashing (including from this author) followed the moment when Nokia told the world that Windows Phone was its future. Two years later, Stephen Elop, the Nokia chief has shown that he is a man of his words. After the Lumia 1020 announcement last week, he told the press why Android isn’t an option.

What’s ironical, however, is that his judgement that Android will end up benefiting one manufacturer was somewhat true, as clear by the case of Samsung.

“What we were worried about a couple of years ago”, he said, “was the very high risk that one hardware manufacturer could come to dominate Android. We had a suspicion of who it might be, because of the resources available, the vertical integration, and we were respectful of the fact that we were quite late in making that decision. Many others were in that space already”. And that’s where Samsung exactly is.

“Now fast forward to today and examine the Android ecosystem, and there are lot of good devices from many different companies, but one company has essentially now become the dominant player.”

While it’s true that other manufacturers have been cashing in from Android quite a lot lately, it’s Samsung which stands atop everyone else, and that too by a monstrous margin.

You look at a number of other Android providers right now and they’re in a tough spot.

This compelled Nokia to look for a third alternative to the competition. The deal with Microsoft has also granted Nokia some exclusive rights and perks, the most prominent among which is the $250 million quarterly payments. They wouldn’t have gotten so much by Google.

While, arguably, Nokia has lost the smartphone race already, but they are still making sufficient enough to keep the ball rolling. And who knows if there might come a time when Windows – backed by mighty Microsoft – outshine other operating systems (in terms of features, performance and apps) and that is when Nokia will have the chance to get crowned again.


  • Angoor khate hain :D

  • Shahzad Ali

    After taking the decision to discontinue Symbian OS, they could rely on both Windows and Android platforms instead of the pairing of Windows along with Java (as used for Asha series).

  • Khurram ShahzAd

    What I always say is, it was worst decision of Nokia not going for android. Nokia was king of cell phone industry but now is just doing good with windows phones with minor overall market share.

    People would still love, if they could bring out few android sets as well. Who knows they can get back the market by that. On other hand with windows phones Nokia could do better than now, but would never be able to come anywhere near android’s market share. Thats just impossible, Google is one thing, where ever it goes, it eats others.

  • Eli Ehsan

    Wise Man! besides Nokia couldn’t possibly have kept up with releasing 231346463564 kinds devices a year as per shOOGLE contracts of Android…..

  • Saeed

    I feel sorry for Nokia, they really had a tough decision to make. Many are and already have bashed and criticized them for not going Android, but they also have a valid point. Either you’re the leader or the chaser, and Nokia didn’t want to be the latter one. Anyhow, WP may still turn out to be a good decision in the long run. Who knows!

  • Afraz Ali Khan

    Nokia will have the chance to get crowned again. very soon!! each nd everythng is possible :)

  • Baghi

    “The deal with Microsoft has also granted Nokia some exclusive rights and perks, the most prominent among which is the $250 million quarterly payments. They wouldn’t have gotten so much by Google.”

    It show that Nokia is more concerned about it’s own Pocket rather than what it’s customer want from them???????

  • Zuhaa Qureshe

    apple $ android is their common rival so they team up with microsoft.