Google Will No Longer Allow 3rd Party Apps on Your Android Phone

Google has been using its Advanced Protection Program to secure devices for quite some time.

It enhances a phone’s security by limiting the number of apps that can access personal data, makes two-factor authentication mandatory for all Google linked accounts, and limits the number of third-party apps that can be sideloaded onto the device.

However, the latest changes to this protection system might become a headache for a lot of Android users as program participants will no longer be able to sideload apps into their phones anymore.

Advertisement

According to Google’s latest blog post:

As an added protection, we’re now blocking the majority of these non-Play apps from being installed on any devices with a Google Account enrolled in Advanced Protection. You can still install non-Play apps through app stores that were pre-installed by the device manufacturer and through Android Debug Bridge

Once this change goes into effect, Android users will only be able to sideload apps using the Android Debug Bridge and the only other sideloaded apps allowed on the phone will be those preloaded by the OEM itself.

Although limiting third-party apps is understandable since it involves risks, limiting what people can do with their devices is questionable, especially for people with devices without Google apps and services, such as the Huawei Mate 30.

These changes are expected to roll out to Android devices later this year as more malware protection arrives in devices worldwide.


    • Mera mobile meri marzi?
      What’s next? Meri pistol meri marzi?
      Itna hee hawaon mein ho tou apna eejad kerlo.
      The “Option” is designed for your own protection. Enroll in it if you want, don’t enroll if you want to continue the age old way of pirating. Because really, who are you kidding? Its presumable that the apps you want to side load with this adopted state of mind is in one way or another involved in some illicit form of benefitting without paying for the content, service, or whatever.
      The least you could do, is not be publicly appalled at a proposed loss of your skewed view of self declared “rights”

  • It’ll be a matter on time when the bypass is available on the internet. Otherwise I’m switching to iPhone!


  • >